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Groceries [Dec. 9th, 2012|10:31 pm]
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[chasingtides]
I am trying to figure out groceries shopping and figured I would ask for advice.

I currently have a great deal of difficulty navigating through the entire grocery store to get my weekly food needs met. No store near me has electric carts (and besides, I would need to carry them many blocks home). No store delivers to my zipcode.

I have, quite literally, no idea of how to deal with this and have been reduced to tears many times in recent weeks. Anny advice?
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[User Picture]From: besame_bj
2012-12-10 03:40 am (UTC)

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I feel for you. I had the same problem and used to go into the store for just a few items and/or buy things from a convenience store just to tide me over.

Could you, perhaps, buy non-perishables (peanut butter, crackers, etc.) from Amazon, then make several small trips for milk, eggs and so on? And are there organic food delivery services in your area? I'm in L.A. and there are several services that'll deliver veggies, fruit, eggs weekly.

Good luck to you!
[User Picture]From: chasingtides
2012-12-10 03:44 am (UTC)

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Organic delivery services?
[User Picture]From: lakmiseiru
2012-12-10 03:45 am (UTC)

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Oh, good point - something like a CSA that you can maybe pay a bit extra to have them deliver to your house, especially if you explain the need.

If there are convenience or corner stores nearer your residence (e.g. 7-11 or Cumberland Farms or gas station stores), they often carry milk and eggs.
[User Picture]From: besame_bj
2012-12-10 03:48 am (UTC)

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In my area, some of them deliver and some you have to come pick up the produce, but like I said, I'm in L.A., so larger metropolitan areas usually have more variety. And I used 7-11 ALL the time!
[User Picture]From: chasingtides
2012-12-10 04:15 am (UTC)

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CSAs around here generally have spring sign ups, not winter ones (I'm on the east coast of the USA)
[User Picture]From: lakmiseiru
2012-12-10 03:43 am (UTC)

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Not sure about getting them home... can you use a wheeled cart (your ability, curb cuts, etc) to roll them home? Get an accessible transport service or taxi or bus? Get a friend who shops weekly to pick things up for you? Maybe you can order dried/canned goods through something like Amazon (shipped via postal mail here in the States, they only have to do Amazon Fresh for perishables) and then carry only the perishables (dairy products, meat, veggies/fruit or whatever subset of those you eat) home to lighten the load, since canned/bulk goods (other than milk) are usually heavier?

In the store, I think you can ask a store employee for help with shopping (I know that in some areas they have to help folks with visual impairments; not sure but I assume they would also be willing to help with other issues) - if you have a list in advance, especially of stuff you don't need to see to buy (e.g. maybe you want to see the produce to check if it's good, but canned goods and dry goods are pretty much the same from week to week), that might help them. I sometimes use shopping carts when I need to lean on them for balance/joint pain (even though I buy only a basket's worth), but that may not work for all.
[User Picture]From: chasingtides
2012-12-10 04:06 am (UTC)

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I have stairs to where I live, so wheeled carts (or my wheelchair) are pretty out of the question, sadly.

I might try asked for help with shopping though. If nothing else, that could work.
[User Picture]From: quiet000001
2012-12-10 04:15 am (UTC)

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It might actually be worth just calling your local supermarket - they may know if there are any services in the area that help people who are disabled (or more often they're aimed at the elderly) get groceries since they'll tend to see the people who do the shopping for the services quite frequently, sometimes buying multiple baskets at a time, etc. It might be a volunteer thing or it might be a paid service, depending on where you are and what's available, but it seems worth asking.

(Note that this might depend somewhat on your local supermarket, I will admit. My local one is a chain but it's small enough and enough of the staff has been there for ages that they notice things like that. I don't know if a more 'generic' type place would have someone who'd know the same info since it's not really a store service.)
[User Picture]From: nightengalesknd
2012-12-10 04:26 am (UTC)

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Admittedly, I have a certain reputation when it comes to luggage racks. But I used to use a milk-crate bungeed to a folding luggage rack, both for getting around the store and getting home. Separated, both the crate and rack can hang over an arm or be pulled up steps via bungee. Walking 10 blocks with cane and luggage rack was not ideal, but certainly better than cane and carry, and the luggage rack was solid enough to stop and rest holding onto. I thought about taking the contraption on a city bus but don't think I ever did. The Blue Bus was another story. . .
[User Picture]From: sayga
2012-12-10 04:54 am (UTC)

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I used a luggage rack for laundry because I couldn't carry the basket across the parking lot at our apartment to the laundry room. It worked really well. Now we have a washer/dryer so my husband carries the baskets up and down the stairs for me and he does the laundry switching, and I do the folding and putting away.

When I've walked to the grocery store, I've used a stroller, a wagon, and a luggage rack to get the groceries home. Things you can push in front work a lot better than things I have to pull behind me (in my experience), but wheels are a great way to get stuff around.
[User Picture]From: chasingtides
2012-12-10 11:30 am (UTC)

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The only foldable carts I've seen are the pull-style - which I know from experience is a bad plan (bag + pull cart + cane + uneven Philadelphia sidewalk = faceplant). I'd think about a push-style - no idea how public transit deals with that, but there's one way to find out - except I've never seen a folding push style. Any ideas on where to find one?
[User Picture]From: nightengalesknd
2012-12-10 04:43 pm (UTC)

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I did better pulling mine with cane than pushing, although it would push if tipped back. I have seen people pushing folding carts that I think were meant for laundry. Maybe a dollar store? Google images had a bunch under "folding cart" from places like walmart and cartsonthego.com, and some look pushable.
[User Picture]From: zandperl
2012-12-10 04:13 am (UTC)

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Can you go to the customer service desk and ask for assistance?
Can you advertise on Craigslist for an assistant with groceries? They could either go with you, or get the groceries and bring them back.
[User Picture]From: chasingtides
2012-12-10 11:31 am (UTC)

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Well, the issue with advertising for help is that then I'm paying for groceries and paying someone to get them - more than basic delivery charges, most likely, since I find it unlikely that anyone over 10 is going to look at "If I give you ten dollars, purchase and delivery my groceries!" - that's most definitely out of my price range for groceries and the month.
From: manutde
2012-12-10 05:36 am (UTC)

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Thank you for sharing